A Review of the New Legends of the Hidden Temple Board Game Along With Some House Rules

I loved, loved the Legends of the Hidden Temple TV show and when the board game came out it, it was an easy buy for me. But a huge red flag for most gamers is that this board game is made by Pressman Toy which hasn’t had the best track record for board games especially after the Oregon Trail Card Game. As it, yes Legends of the Hidden Temple isn’t a good board game.

Legends of the Hidden Temple Board Game

But its biggest strength is the nostalgia factor and playing this brought back all sort of warm memories of the show. All in all, I think the Legend of the Hidden Temple board game does replicate the show well… almost to a fault. The show made the contestants do some silly things so likewise this board game made you do some silly things. For example, you have to flip a cup in one challenge and play sort of a simple version of beer pong in another. I actually don’t mind this but this is why I recommend playing this with only people who have seen the show. If they never seen the show, this would just be a bad party game.

The biggest problem though is this game is too long and it kind of drags on. If you play with a large group, many of the eliminated players will have a lot of time to kill. Some of the rules are a little vague too so I recommend some house rules.

  • In the first moat challenge, you have to quickly roll dice to match your team’s side and move up if you do but if you roll the opposite team’s side you lose some of your progress. I would just do away with this rule so you always make forward progress. Also it is a bit unclear but I play it as ten spaces you have complete to win and only the first two teams to finish gets to move on because…
  • I only played one of the three temple games challenges which each playthrough which means you have to award the two other pendants elsewhere. The first team to finish the moat challenge get the first pendant (the next player to finish just gets to move on). The two teams then play the steps of knowledge challenge and the first team to get three questions right gets the second pendant.
  • For the Smashed Printing Plate of Frederick Douglass challenge (basically the card game slap), there is no reason to play through the whole deck. I just play with 40 random cards which is a little more than half the deck.
  • Finally in the temple run challenge, the silver monkey rules are a little vague. I play it as a memory game. You can only look at one card at a time and have flip the card face down before you look at another card. When you know where the base, the middle and head are, point it out and flip the cards to see if you are right. If you are wrong, flip all the card face down again and shuffle it and start over.
  • This is not really a house rule but I always play the Temple Run song in the final challenge to add to the suspense. It is a good way to keep track of time too.

I think all these house rules speed up the game and gets to the good part (the temple run) faster. It also adds a little variety and replayability to the game since you can play a different temple game each time. All in all, this board game isn’t for everyone but there is something there and I wished it was refined just a bit.

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